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[Australia]: Department of Finance and Deregulation

Owen

Commonwealth of Australia
Joined
Jul 2, 2018
Messages
748
Likes
18

Headquarters

One Canberra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Hierarchy

Office(s):

Officeholder:

Image:

Minister for Finance and Deregulation

Senator The Hon. Katy Gallagher

Special Minister of State

The Hon. Mark Dreyfus, QC, MP

Secretary of the Department of Finance and Deregulation

David Tune, AO, PSM

Responsibilities

  • Budget policy advice and process, and review of governmental programs
  • Government financial accountability, governance and financial management frameworks, including grants and procurement policy and services
  • Shareholder advice on Government Business Enterprises and commercial entities treated as Government Business Enterprises
  • General policy guidelines for Commonwealth statutory authorities
  • Superannuation arrangements for Australian Government civilian employees and members of parliament and retirement benefits for federal judges and Governors-General
  • Government asset sales
  • Commonwealth property policy framework, legislation and policy for the management of property leased or owned by the Commonwealth, including acquisition, disposal and management of property interests
  • Management of non-defence Commonwealth property in Australia, including construction, major refurbishment, sustainability, acquisition, ownership and disposal of real property
  • Electoral matters
  • Administration of parliamentarians' entitlements
  • Administration of the Australian Government’s self-managed general insurance fund
  • Government online delivery and information technology and communications management
  • Policy advice on the Future Fund and nation-building funds and authorisation of payments from the nation-building funds to agencies
  • Coordination of government advertising
  • Management of government records
  • Official establishments, ownership and property management of the Prime Minister's official residences



Overview

The Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) is the independent federal agency in charge of organising, conducting and supervising federal elections, by-elections and referendums. The AEC's main responsibility is to conduct federal elections, by-elections and referendums. The AEC is also responsible for the maintenance of an up-to-date electoral roll, electorate boundaries, apportionments and redistributions. Under the Joint Roll Arrangements, the AEC maintains the electoral roll for the whole of Australia, which is used by the state and territory Electoral Commissions to conduct their elections. The AEC publishes detailed election results and follows up electors who fail to vote. The AEC is also responsible for registering political parties intending to field candidates at federal elections, monitoring the activities of those political parties, including receiving returns from parties of donations and expenditures, and the publication of the information. The AEC also plays an electoral education role, aiming to educate citizens about the electoral process by which representatives are elected, and by which the Australian Constitution is changed. Since 1984, Australian political parties have been publicly funded by the AEC. The objective of public funding is to reduce the influence of private money upon elections, and consequently, the influence of private money upon the shaping of public policy. After each election, the AEC distributes a set amount of money to each political party, per vote received. A candidate or Senate group needs 4% of the primary vote to be eligible for public funding. In Australia and in each state and territory, it is a legal offence to fail to vote at any federal or state election, punishable by a nominal fine. The amount varies between federal and state elections.

The AEC is answerable to the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters of the Parliament of Australia, and must report on how elections were carried out and the success of elections in general. The AEC was created by and operates under the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918. It consists of a chairman (a Judge or a retired Judge of the Federal Court); currently The Hon. Peter Heerey, the Electoral Commissioner; currently Tom Rogers and a non-judicial member (usually the Australian Statistician); currently David Kalisch. The Electoral Commissioner has the powers of a Secretary of a Department under the Public Service Act 1999 and the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1998. Each House of Representatives electorate has a Divisional Returning Officer responsible for administration of elections within the division. Each State also has an Australian Electoral Officer responsible for administration of Senate elections. The AEC has a national office in Canberra and an office in each State and Territory: Adelaide, Brisbane, Darwin, Hobart, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney. State and local government elections are overseen by separate Electoral Commissions in each state and territory:

  • New South Wales Electoral Commission
  • Electoral Commission of Queensland
  • Victorian Electoral Commission
  • Electoral Commission of South Australia
  • Tasmanian Electoral Commission
  • Western Australian Electoral Commission
  • Northern Territory Electoral Commission
  • Australian Capital Territory Electoral Commission
The Constitutional and legal provisions which impact on the choice of the federal election date include:
  • Section 12 of the Constitution says: "The Governor of any State may cause writs to be issued for the election of Senators for that State."
  • Section 13 of the Constitution provides that the election of Senators shall be held in the period of twelve months before the places become vacant.
  • Section 28 of the Constitution says: "Every House of Representatives shall continue for three years from the first sitting of the House, and no longer, but may be sooner dissolved by the Governor-General."
  • Section 32 of the Constitution says: "The writs shall be issued within ten days from the expiry of a House of Representatives or from the proclamation of a dissolution thereof."
  • Section 57 of the Constitution says: "A double dissolution shall not take place within six months before the date of the expiry of the House of Representatives."
  • Section 156(1) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 says: "The date fixed for the nomination of the candidates shall not be less than 10 days nor more than 27 days after the date of the writ".
  • Section 157 of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 says: "The date fixed for the polling shall not be less than 23 days nor more than 31 days after the date of nomination".
  • Section 158 of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 says: "The day fixed for the polling shall be a Saturday".

Election Schedule

Election:

Last Held:

Next Date:

House of Representatives Election

7 September 2013

On or before the 14 January 2017
On or before the 16 July 2016 (Double Dissolution)

Half-Senate Election (36 out of 72 State Senators, all 4 Territory Senators)

7 September 2013

After the 1 July 2016 and before the 30 June 2017
On or before the 16 July 2016 (Double Dissolution)

New South Wales Legislative Assembly and Half-Legislative Council Election

26 March 2011

28 March 2015

Victoria Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council Election

27 November 2010

29 November 2014

Queensland Legislative Assembly Election

24 March 2012

On or before the 20 June 2015

Western Australia Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council Election

9 March 2013

11 March 2017

South Australia House of Assembly and Half-Legislative Council Election

15 March 2014

17 March 2018

Tasmania House of Assembly Election

15 March 2014

On or before the 19 May 2018

Tasmania Legislative Council Election (2 or 3 seats)

6 May 2013

3 May 2014

Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly Election

20 October 2012

15 October 2016

Northern Territory Legislative Assembly Election

25 August 2012

27 August 2016

Norfolk Island Legislative Assembly Election

13 March 2013

19 March 2016



State-by-State Two-Party Preferred

Division:

Labor:

Coalition:

Swing from 2010 Election:

National

52.7%

47.3%

+6.2%

New South Wales

53.7%

46.3%

+8.0%

Victoria

54.3%

45.7%

+4.1%

Queensland

50.4%

49.6%

+7.4%

Western Australia

46.7%

53.3%

+5.0%

South Australia

52.4%

47.6%

+4.8%

Tasmania

56.2%

43.8%

+5.0%

Australian Capital Territory

63.4%

36.6%

+3.5%

Northern Territory

55.4%

44.6%

+5.8%

Senate:

House of Representatives:

Government (32):
Australian Labor Party (32)

Opposition (37):
Liberal Party of Australia (32)
National Party of Australia (4)
Country Liberal Party (1)

Crossbench (7):
Australian Greens (5)
Family First Party (1)
Independents (1)

Government (83):
Australian Labor Party (83)

Opposition (65):
Liberal Party of Australia (55)
National Party of Australia (10)

Crossbench (2):
Independents (2)

Senators Elected in 2010

New South Wales:

Victoria:

Queensland:

Western Australia:

South Australia:

Tasmania:

  • Jenny McAllister
  • Deborah O'Neill
  • Tony Sheldon
  • Andrew Bragg
  • Concetta Fierravanti-Wells
  • Fiona Nash

  • Kim Carr
  • Kimberley Kitching
  • James Paterson
  • Jane Hume
  • Bridget McKenzie
  • Richard Di Natale

  • Anthony Chisholm
  • John Hogg
  • George Brandis
  • Paul Scarr
  • Barnaby Joyce
  • Larissa Waters

  • Sue Lines
  • Glenn Sterle
  • Slade Brockman
  • Matt O'Sullivan
  • Linda Reynolds
  • Dean Smith

  • Don Farrell
  • Alex Gallacher
  • Anne McEwen
  • David Fawcett
  • Anne Ruston
  • Mary Jo Fisher

  • Carol Brown
  • Helen Polley
  • Eric Abetz
  • Richard Colbeck
  • Claire Chandler
  • Nick McKim

Senators Elected in 2013

New South Wales:

Victoria:

Queensland:

Western Australia:

South Australia:

Tasmania:

Australian Capital Territory:

Northern Territory:

  • Tim Ayres
  • Kristina Keneally
  • Doug Cameron
  • Hollie Hughes
  • Marise Payne
  • Arthur Sinodinos

  • Raff Ciccone
  • Jess Walsh
  • Jacinta Collins
  • Mitch Fifield
  • Scott Ryan
  • David Van

  • Nita Green
  • Murray Watt
  • Claire Moore
  • Amanda Stoker
  • James McGrath
  • Matt Canavan

  • Pat Dodson
  • Louis Pratt
  • Michaelia Cash
  • Mathias Cormann
  • David Johnston
  • Scott Ludlam

  • Penny Wong
  • Marielle Smith
  • Alex Antic
  • Simon Birmingham
  • Sarah Hanson-Young
  • Lucy Gichuhi

  • Catryna Bilyk
  • Anne Urquhart
  • Lisa Singh
  • Wendy Askew
  • Jonathon Duniam
  • Jacqui Lambie

  • Katy Gallagher
  • Zed Seselja

  • Malarndirri McCarthy
  • Nigel Scullion

Post-Redistribution Government Seats (87)

Seat:

Member:

Current Party:

Post-Redistribution Party:

New Margin:

La Trobe (VIC)

Jason Wood

Liberal Party of Australia

Australian Labor Party

50.1%

Bennelong (NSW)

John Alexander

Liberal Party of Australia

Australian Labor Party

50.2%

Corangamite (VIC)

Libby Coker

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

50.2%

Longman (QLD)

Susan Lamb

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

50.5%

Cowan (WA)

Anne Aly

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

50.5%

Dickson (QLD)

Peter Dutton

Liberal Party of Australia

Australian Labor Party

50.7%

Deakin (VIC)

Michael Sukkar

Liberal Party of Australia

Australian Labor Party

50.9%

Flynn (QLD)

Zac Beers

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

50.9%

Bass (TAS)

Ross Hart

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

51.0%

Herbert (QLD)

Cathy O'Toole

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

51.2%

Leichhardt (QLD)

Warren Entsch

Liberal Party of Australia

Australian Labor Party

51.7%

Braddon (TAS)

Justine Keay

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

52.4%

Hindmarsh (SA)

Steve Georganas

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

52.9%

Forde (QLD)

Des Hardman

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

53.0%

Brisbane (QLD)

Paul Newbury

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

53.1%

Macquarie (NSW)

Susan Templeman

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

53.5%

Bonner (QLD)

Jo Briskey

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

53.7%

Denison (TAS)

Ben McGregor

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

53.8% vs. Independent

Lyons (TAS)

Dick Adams

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

53.8%

Gilmore (NSW)

Ann Sudmalis

Liberal Party of Australia

Australian Labor Party

54.2%

McEwen (VIC)

Rob Mitchell

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

54.3%

Solomon (NT)

Luke Gosling

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

54.4%

Reid (NSW)

Craig Laundy

Liberal Party of Australia

Australian Labor Party

54.7%

Macarthur (NSW)

Mike Freelander

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

54.7%

Robertson (NSW)

Anne Charlton

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

54.9%

Page (NSW)

Janelle Saffin

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

54.9%

Lindsay (NSW)

Emma Husar

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

55.0%

Eden-Monaro (NSW)

Mike Kelly

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

55.1%

Banks (NSW)

David Coleman

Liberal Party of Australia

Australian Labor Party

55.2%

Bendigo (VIC)

Lisa Chesters

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

55.4%

Chisholm (VIC)

Anna Burke

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

55.7%

Bruce (VIC)

Julian Hill

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

55.9%

Capricornia (QLD)

Leisa Neaton

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

56.6%

Lingiari (NT)

Warren Snowdon

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

56.7%

Petrie (QLD)

Corinne Mulholland

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

56.9%

Jagajaga (VIC)

Kate Thwaites

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

57.2%

Perth (WA)

Patrick Gorman

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

57.2%

Melbourne Ports (VIC)

Michael Danby

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

57.7%

Isaacs (VIC)

Mark Dreyfus

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

58.0%

Dobell (NSW)

Emma McBride

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

58.2%

Wakefield (SA)

Nick Champion

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

58.2%

Paterson (NSW)

Meryl Swanson

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

58.3%

Lilley (QLD)

Anika Wells

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

58.7%

Adelaide (SA)

Kate Ellis

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

58.7%

Brand (WA)

Gary Gray

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

58.7%

Ballarat (VIC)

Catherine King

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

59.0%

Moreton (QLD)

Graham Perrett

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

59.0%

Parramatta (NSW)

Julie Owens

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

59.3%

Richmond (NSW)

Justine Elliot

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

59.6%

Makin (SA)

Tony Zappia

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

59.9%

Franklin (TAS)

Julie Collins

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

60.1%

Griffith (QLD)

Terri Butler

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

60.4%

Fremantle (WA)

Josh Wilson

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

60.4%

Kingsford Smith (NSW)

Matt Thistlethwaite

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

60.7%

Greenway (NSW)

Michelle Rowland

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

61.0%

Canberra (ACT)

Alicia Payne

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

61.0%

Oxley (QLD)

Milton Dick

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

61.2%

Hotham (VIC)

Clare O'Neil

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

61.4%

Corio (VIC)

Richard Marles

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

61.8%

Rankin (QLD)

Jim Chalmers

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

62.2%

Barton (NSW)

Linda Burney

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

62.4%

McMahon (NSW)

Chris Bowen

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

62.6%

Blair (QLD)

Shayne Neumann

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

62.7%

Holt (VIC)

Anthony Byrne

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

63.2%

Hunter (NSW)

Joel Fitzgibbon

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

63.7%

Werriwa (NSW)

Anne Stanley

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

64.5%

Kingston (SA)

Amanda Rishworth

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

64.5%

Batman (VIC)

Ged Kearney

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

64.7% vs. Greens

Whitlam (NSW)

Stephen Jones

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

64.9%

Shortland (NSW)

Pat Conroy

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

65.4%

Maribyrnong (VIC)

Bill Shorten

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

65.5%

Fenner (ACT)

Andrew Leigh

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

66.0%

Lalor (VIC)

Joanne Ryan

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

66.3%

Watson (NSW)

Tony Burke

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

66.9%

Newcastle (NSW)

Sharon Claydon

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

67.4%

Calwell (VIC)

Maria Vamvakinou

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

68.0%

Scullin (VIC)

Andrew Giles

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

68.4%

Port Adelaide (SA)

Mark Butler

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

68.8%

Chifley (NSW)

Ed Husic

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

68.9%

Blaxland (NSW)

Jason Clare

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

69.2%

Wills (VIC)

Peter Khalil

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

69.3% vs. Greens

Cunningham (NSW)

Sharon Bird

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

69.3%

Gorton (VIC)

Brendan O'Connor

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

70.2%

Gellibrand (VIC)

Tim Watts

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

70.6%

Fowler (NSW)

Chris Hayes

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

70.9%

Sydney (NSW)

Tanya Plibersek

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

70.9%

Grayndler (NSW)

Anthony Albanese

Australian Labor Party

Australian Labor Party

76.8%

Post-Redistribution Opposition Seats (60)

Seat:

Member:

Current Party:

Post-Redistribution Party:

New Margin:

Dawson (QLD)

Belinda Hassan

Australian Labor Party

Liberal Party of Australia

50.2%

Hasluck (WA)

Ken Wyatt

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

51.0%

Burt (WA)

Matt Keogh

Australian Labor Party

Liberal Party of Australia

51.1%

Ryan (QLD)

Julian Simmonds

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

51.1%

Dunkley (VIC)

Peta Murphy

Australian Labor Party

Liberal Party of Australia

51.5%

Bowman (QLD)

Andrew Laming

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

51.5%

Hinkler (QLD)

Keith Pitt

National Party of Australia

National Party of Australia

51.6%

Swan (WA)

Steve Irons

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

52.3%

Boothby (SA)

Nicolle Flint

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

52.3%

Fisher (QLD)

Andrew Wallace

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

52.4%

Casey (VIC)

Tony Smith

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

53.1%

Hughes (NSW)

Craig Kelly

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

53.8%

Stirling (WA)

Vince Connelly

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

54.0%

Aston (VIC)

Alan Tudge

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

54.1%

Fairfax (QLD)

Ted O'Brien

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

54.3%

Pearce (WA)

Christian Porter

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

54.3%

Wright (QLD)

Scott Buchholz

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

54.4%

Indi (VIC)

Sophie Mirabella

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

55.0%

Cowper (NSW)

Luke Hartsuyker

National Party of Australia

National Party of Australia

55.2%

Sturt (SA)

Christopher Pyne

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

55.3%

McPherson (QLD)

Karen Andrews

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

55.6%

Hume (VIC)

Angus Taylor

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

55.6%

Lyne (NSW)

David Gillespie

National Party of Australia

National Party of Australia

55.6%

Wide Bay (QLD)

Llew O'Brien

National Party of Australia

National Party of Australia

55.8%

Higgins (VIC)

Kelly O'Dwyer

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

55.8%

Wannon (VIC)

Dan Tehan

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

56.0%

Canning (WA)

Andrew Hastie

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

56.3%

Goldstein (VIC)

Tim Wilson

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

56.9%

Calare (NSW)

Andrew Gee

National Party of Australia

National Party of Australia

57.0%

Fadden (QLD)

Stuart Robert

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

57.0%

Kooyong (VIC)

Josh Frydenberg

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

57.0%

Warringah (NSW)

Tony Abbott

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

57.3%

Moore (WA)

Ian Goodenough

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

57.4%

Cook (NSW)

Scott Morrison

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

57.7%

Mayo (SA)

Jamie Briggs

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

57.7%

Flinders (VIC)

Greg Hunt

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

57.7%

McMillan (VIC)

Russell Broadbent

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

57.7%

North Sydney (NSW)

Trent Zimmerman

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

57.7%

Tangney (WA)

Ben Morton

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

58.0%

Grey (SA)

Rowan Ramsey

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

58.7%

Forrest (WA)

Nola Marino

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

58.8%

Groom (QLD)

John McVeigh

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

59.1%

Durack (WA)

Melissa Price

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

59.9%

Menzies (VIC)

Kevin Andrews

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

60.3%

Moncrieff (QLD)

Angie Bell

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

60.6%

Mackellar (NSW)

Jason Falinski

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

60.8%

Wentworth (NSW)

Malcolm Turnbull

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

60.9%

Berowra (NSW)

Julian Leeser

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

61.0%

Riverina (NSW)

Michael McCormack

National Party of Australia

National Party of Australia

61.0%

Gippsland (VIC)

Darren Chester

National Party of Australia

National Party of Australia

61.7%

Barker (SA)

Tony Pasin

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

61.7%

Parkes (NSW)

Mark Coulton

National Party of Australia

National Party of Australia

61.9%

O'Connor (WA)

Rick Wilson

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

62.3%

Bradfield (NSW)

Paul Fletcher

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

62.9%

Curtin (WA)

Julie Bishop

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

63.2%

Mitchell (NSW)

Alex Hawke

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

63.4%

Farrer (NSW)

Sussan Ley

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

63.7%

Maranoa (QLD)

David Littleproud

National Party of Australia

National Party of Australia

64.9%

Murray (VIC)

Sharman Stone

Liberal Party of Australia

Liberal Party of Australia

66.8%

Mallee (VIC)

Anne Webster

National Party of Australia

National Party of Australia

69.6%

Post-Redistribution Crossbench (3)

Seat:

Member:

Current Party:

Post-Redistribution Party:

New Margin:

Melbourne (VIC)

Luke Creasey

Australian Labor Party

Australian Greens

51.2% vs. Labor

Kennedy (QLD)

Bob Katter

Independent

Independent

68.3% vs. Nationals

New England (NSW)

Tony Windsor

Independent

Independent

71.5% vs. Nationals


Overview

The Future Fund is an independently managed sovereign wealth fund into which the Australian Government deposits funds to meet the its future liabilities for the payment of superannuation to retired civil servants of the Australian Public Service. The stated aim of the fund is to hold $140 billion by 2030; which would fund the $7 billion in superannuation payments each year from the federal budget. Withdrawals from the fund to pay superannuation benefits can only take place once the superannuation liability has been fully offset or 1 July 2030, whichever is the earlier. The Future Fund Board is currently also responsible for five other Australian sovereign wealth funds:

  • Building Australia Fund: An infrastructure fund to provide investment in infrastructure projects
  • Education Investment Fund: A fund to provide capital investment in higher education and vocational education and training
  • DisabilityCare Australia Fund: A fund to contribute to the cost of the National Disability Insurance Scheme
  • Medical Research Future Fund: A fund to disperse interest generated to medical research
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Land and Sea Future Fund: A fund to enhance the Commonwealth’s ability to make payments to the Indigenous Land Corporation
80% of the total funds that the Future Fund Board manages is to be directed to the Future Fund, 7% to the DisabilityCare Australia Fund, 5% to the Medical Research Future Fund, 3% each to the Building Australia and Education Investment Fund and 2% to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Land and Sea Future Fund. The current Chairman of the Board is David Gonski and the current managing director is David Neal.


Head Office

Old Parliament East Block, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Overview

The National Archives of Australia is an Australian Government agency that collects, preserves and encourages access to important Australian Government records. The Archives’ collection includes over 40 million documents, files, objects, images and audiovisual items. These records trace events and decisions that have shaped the nation and the lives of all Australians. They capture everyday experiences; such as work, leisure and fashion, alongside major issues such as immigration, war, democracy and national government. The National Archives therefore informs personal and family stories, social and technological developments, and local and national history. All visitors are welcome to explore the collection, both online and in person at reading rooms located in Canberra and in each state capital. The National Archives of Australia is the only national cultural institution with an office in each state and territory. National Archives staff work with Australian Government agencies to identify, classify and preserve significant records, now largely in digital formats. The Archives also shares materials through mounting exhibitions, publishing books and guides to the collection, delivering educational programmes and participating in collaborative projects. The current Director-General is David Fricker.

Among the most popular National Archives items are defence service and immigration records, which often contain valuable sources for family history. They capture the lives, movements and networks of many individuals, and may include photographs, samples of handwriting and signatures. The collection also includes the correspondence and reports of a vast number of Australian Government agencies, documenting activities such as Federation, Governors-General, Prime Ministers, Cabinet and Ministers. Most records over 20 years old are released for public access on request. Cabinet notebooks have a longer closed period of 30 years. However, some exemptions include documents relating to defence and security and sensitive personal information. Access to items of cultural sensitivity to Indigenous Australians may also be restricted. There are several notable collections held by the National Archives of Australia. They include:

  • Founding documents, including the Royal Commission of Assent, the Constitution Act and other records created when the six colonies federated to create the Commonwealth of Australia on 1 January 1901
  • World War I and World War II service records. Some 376,000 service records for men and women who served in World War I have been digitised and are available online at the Discovering Anzacs website
  • The Griffin drawings; Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony Griffin's winning entry for the design of Australia's Federal Capital
  • The 7,700 Mildenhall glass plate photographs taken by government photographer Jack Mildenhall that record Canberra during the 1920s and 1930s
  • More than 34,000 immigration photographs
  • Copyright, patent and trademark registration records documenting Australian creativity and ingenuity.


Overview

The Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO) is a branch of the Australian Government with the responsibility to the promote and coordinate the use of new information and communications technology to deliver Government policies, information, programs and services. AGIMO fosters the efficient and effective use of information and communication technologies by Australian Government departments and agencies. It provides strategic advice, activities and representation relating to the application of ICT to government administration, information and services. AGIMO administers the Australian Government's online gateways such as australia.gov.au and directory.gov.au as well as the pan-government online collaboration service; Govdex, the government's dynamic electronic form; SmartForm, the government's content management and website hosting service; govCMS, the parliamentary broadcast network between government entities in the ACT; Parliamentary Television (ParlTV), and a range of secure government communication services such as the Intra-Government Communications Network, Ministerial Communications Network, National Telepresence System, Data Carriage Service and GovLink. The current Chief Information Officer is Glenn Archer and the Chief Technology Officer is John Sheridan.


Overview

The Commonwealth Superannuation Corporation (CSC) provides superannuation services and products to Australian Government employees, employers and Australian Defence Force members and their families. CSC is trustee of five regulated superannuation schemes:

  • Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme
  • Public Sector Superannuation Scheme
  • Public Sector Superannuation Accumulation Plan
  • Australian Defence Force Superannuation Scheme
  • Military Superannuation and Benefts Scheme
CSC administers six exempt public sector schemes that are not regulated under the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993:
  • Australian Defence Force Cover Scheme
  • Defence Force Retirement and Death Benefits Scheme
  • 1922 Scheme
  • Defence Forces Retirement Benefits (DFRB) Scheme
  • Papua New Guinea Scheme
  • Defence Force (Superannuation) (Productivity Benefit) Determination
  • Parliamentary Retiring Allowances Trust


Overview

The Independent Parliamentary Expenses Authority (IPEA) is a statutory agency, subject to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, with its structure and functions governed by the Independent Parliamentary Expenses Authority Act 2010. IPEA was established with advisory, reporting and auditing responsibilities for the work expenses of Parliamentarians and their staff. It also provides advice, monitors and administers claims for travel expenses and allowances by parliamentarians and their employees, ensuring that taxpayers' funds are spent appropriately and in compliance with the relevant principles and regulations.


Overview

ASC Pty. Ltd., formerly the Australian Submarine Corporation, is an Australian government business enterprise involved with Australian naval shipbuilding, headquartered in Osborne, South Australia. ASC Pty Ltd is a proprietary limited company registered under the Corporations Act 2001. ASC is wholly-owned by the Commonwealth, represented by the Minister for Finance and Deregulation. ASC exists to serve the frontline of Australia's naval defence capabilities. With more than 2,500 employees across three facilities in South Australia and Western Australia, ASC has evolved into Australia's largest specialised defence shipbuilding organisation, with naval design and engineering resources unparalleled within Australia's defence industry. As maintainer for the Collins Class submarines, and shipbuilder for the Hobart Class destroyers Arafura Class offshore patrol vessels, ASC is the repository for sovereign shipbuilding capability. The company’s name was changed from the Australian Submarine Corporation Pty Ltd to ASC Pty Ltd on 1 October 2004 in order to position it as a supplier of naval combat vessels in addition to being a specialist submarine supplier and maintainer. ASC rose to prominence in 1987 when it was contracted by the Australian Government to design and manufacture a fleet of six Collins-class submarines for the Royal Australian Navy in what was the largest defence contract ever signed in Australia. The current Chairman is Bruce Carter and the current CEO is Stuart Whiley.


Overview

Australian Naval Infrastructure Pty. Ltd. (ANI) is placing Australia at the forefront of naval infrastructure capability. ANI is a wholly-owned Commonwealth company, bound by the Corporations Act 2001 and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, and was prescribed as a Government Business Enterprise. ANI is a nation-building commitment by the Government of Australia and sees the establishment of state-of-the-art infrastructure for the domestic manufacture of world class naval vessels. ANI stands for reinvesting into the nation’s economy and its skilled workforce through creating a continuous thriving industry that is in the best interests of Australia.


Overview

COMCAR is an Australian Government agency, which provides car-with-driver and other ground transport services to the Prime Minister, Governor‑General, members of parliament, judges and official guests of government. COMCAR has a national presence, with drivers located in each state and territory and uses hire cars and taxis to supplement the fleet at peak times and in regional and country areas. COMCAR drivers:

  • Provide car-with-driver service as directed, in a safe, courteous and efficient manner to all COMCAR clients
  • Maintain a professional appearance at all times, including between driving duties
  • Carry luggage, open vehicle doors and assist passengers as required
  • Proactively maintain the vehicles cleanliness to ensure a high level of presentation to all clients
  • Observe confidentiality protocols, discretion and business policies and procedures, including maintenance of accurate documentation
  • Carry out vehicle clean, administrative and ad hoc depot duties as required

Fleet

Type:

Amount:

Image:

Holden Caprice

160

BMW 7 Series

6

BMW X5

12

Rolls-Royce Phantom VI

2


Overview

Comcover is the Australian Government's general insurance fund. Comcover provides insurance and risk management services to all Commonwealth General Government Sector entities and the High Court of Australia. Fund members purchase cover for all normally insurable risks, with the exception of workers' compensation, which is the responsibility of the Australian Government's Comcare programme. Comcover aims to protect the Australian Government's financial standing and reputation. Comcover facilitates the integration of risk management into government functions and operations by providing comprehensive and responsive risk management and insurance services to Fund Members. Since the Australian Government introduced Comcover in 1998, Commonwealth entities in the General Government sector have generally been required to be part of the Fund. With this in mind, Comcover moved swiftly to become a service-oriented organisation, committed to assisting its Fund Members. Comcover works in partnership with its Fund Members to promote a risk management culture and deliver an effective insurance program across the Australian Government.


Overview

The Council manages a political exchange programme to arrange visits of young political leaders between Australia and other countries. The Council's purpose is to provide opportunities for young Australians involved in politics to study the political systems of other countries, as well as offering a unique insight into the Australian political system to young people from participating exchange countries. The activities of the Council are funded through an annual appropriation to the Department of Finance and Deregulation. The Council also receives in-kind donations from organisations and individuals. The Council is comprised of up to six members who are selected by the principals of the council. The current principals are the Parliamentary leaders of the three major political parties in the Australian Government, currently; Senator Dean Smith (Liberal), Michael Danby MP (Labor), National Secretary of the Australian Labor Party Noah Carroll, Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), Federal Director of the Liberal Party of Australia Andrew Hirst and Mark Coulton MP (Nationals). Secretariat services are provided by the Department. It was created with the support of the leaders of the major Parliamentary political parties, to arrange visits of young political leaders between Australia and other countries.

 
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