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Thailand | Operation Aerial Shield

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Bossza007

I am From Thailand
GA Member
World Power
May 4, 2021
2,159

Defence-Ministry.png

Title: Operation Aerial Shield
Document Number: RTAF-AERSE-001/2003
Classification: TOP SECRET
Security Level: Maximum Secure
Date: May 26, 2003
XI. IntroductionX

1.1 Background
With the Thai Navy Coast Guard having already performed its duty to safeguard the Thai and regional waters, the Republic Thai Air Force also has its duty to achieve.

1.2 Objective
The objective of Operation Aerial Shield is for the Republic Thai Air Force's Fighter Squadrons to serve as the Combat Patrol units as stated in the Defense Ministry Document. The overarching objective is to protect the Thai airspace and its interests over the vast sky.

XII. Command and ControlX

2.1 Guidance
This operation is conducted under the guidance of the Commander-in-Chief of the Republic Thai Air Force, Marshal of the Air Force, Thananit Niumtundhi, with support from Defence Minister, Sutin Klungsang, and approval from Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra.

XIII. Operational ForcesX

Republic Thai Air Force First Wing
  • Khok Kathiam Airbase
    • 102nd Fighter Squadron
      • [6] Saab JA 37D
        • 12 Pilots
        • 230 Ground Crews
  • Don Muang Airbase
    • 103rd Fighter Squadron
      • [6] Saab JA 37D
        • 12 Pilots
        • 230 Ground Crews
  • Takhil Airbase
    • 405th Fighter Squadron "Dragon"
      • [4] F-16AM Block 20 MLU
      • [2] F-16BM Block 20 MLU
        • 8 Pilots
        • 575 Ground Crews
  • Kamphaeng Saen Airbase
    • 406th Fighter Squadron "Focus"
      • [4] F-16AM Block 20 MLU
      • [2] F-16BM Block 20 MLU
        • 8 Pilots
        • 575 Ground Crews
Republic Thai Air Force Second Wing
  • Phitsanulok Airbase
    • 104th Fighter Squadron
      • [6] Saab JA 37D
        • 12 Pilots
        • 230 Ground Crews
  • Chiang Mai Airbase
    • 401st Fighter Squadron "Thunder"
      • [4] F-16AM Block 20 MLU
      • [2] F-16BM Block 20 MLU
        • 8 Pilots
        • 575 Ground Crews
Republic Thai Air Force Third Wing
  • Surat Thani Airbase
    • 101st Fighter Squadron
      • [6] Saab JA 37D
        • 12 Pilots
        • 230 Ground Crews
    • 701st Air Control Squadron
      • [2] Saab 340 AEW&C
        • 12 Crews
        • 230 Ground Crews
  • Korat Airbase
    • 105th Fighter Squadron
      • [6] Saab JA 37D
        • 12 Pilots
        • 230 Ground Crews
  • Prachuap Kiri Khan Airbase
    • 407th Fighterl Squadron "Python"
      • [4] F-16AM Block 20 MLU
      • [2] F-16BM Block 20 MLU
        • 8 Pilots
        • 575 Ground Crews
  • Hat Yai Airbase
    • 408th Fighter Squadron "Cobra"
      • [4] F-16AM Block 20 MLU
      • [2] F-16BM Block 20 MLU
        • 8 Pilots
        • 575 Ground Crews
    • 702nd Air Control Squadron
      • [2] Saab 340 AEW&C
        • 12 Crews
        • 230 Ground Crews
Republic Thai Navy Fourth Wing
  • Udorn Airbase
    • 402nd Fighter Squadron "Hunter"
      • [4] F-16AM Block 20 MLU
      • [2] F-16BM Block 20 MLU
        • 8 Pilots
        • 575 Ground Crews
  • Ubon Airbase
    • 403rd Fighter Squadron "Sunny"
      • [4] F-16AM Block 20 MLU
      • [2] F-16BM Block 20 MLU
        • 8 Pilots
        • 575 Ground Crews
  • Sa Kaeo Airbase
    • 404th Fighter Squadron "Mosquito"
      • [4] F-16AM Block 20 MLU
      • [2] F-16BM Block 20 MLU
        • 8 Pilots
        • 575 Ground Crews

XIV. ExecutionX

4.1 Initial Deployment
All personnel will be reported to the respective base with all necessary equipment per the Defense Ministry documents.

4.2 Communication
Effective communication among all the units must be maintained. Any unidentified or suspicious activity must be reported to the command center immediately.

4.3 Rules of Engagement
Engagement will be per the established Rule of Engagement (ROE) with the application of Increased Vigilance (IVG) and international laws. The use of force must be proportionate, and only used in self-defense or to deter identified threats after all non-lethal methods have been exhausted.

4.4 Support
Logistical support, including fuel, supplies, and maintenance, will be provided by the respective air bases.

XV. CoordinationX

5.1 Inter-agency
Liaise with various agencies such as the Marine Police, Customs Department, air traffic control, Thai police, civilian airlines, and Fisheries Department to ensure maximum coverage and sharing of intelligence.

5.2 International
In case any foreign aircraft are involved, contact must be established with the respective embassies or consulates and the situation must be reported to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

XVI. ConclusionX

6.1 The Ministry of Defense has mobilized the necessary resources to secure the airspace of Thailand and the national interest to ensure the interest and safety of the Thai People. Through the deployment of Operation Aerial Shield assets and with the support of inter-agency cooperation, the mission of safeguarding the sovereignty and security of Thailand's maritime domain will be executed.

6.2 Continuous assessment of the operation will be done to adjust the deployment and strategy as necessary.

Approving Authority:
[Signature]
Marshal of the Air Force Thananit Niumtundhi
Commander-in-Chief, Republic Thai Air Force

[Signature]
Gen. Chavalit Yongchaiyudh
Defence Minister

[Signature]
Thaksin Shinawatra
Prime Minister, Republic of Thailand

Document Clearance:
The Office of the Prime Minister
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs
The Ministry of Interior
The National Intelligence Agency
The Republic Thai Air Force Command Center
The Republic Thai Navy Command Center
The Republic Thai Armed Forces Special Warfare & Operation Command

Distribution List:
The Office of the Prime Minister
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs
The Ministry of Interior
The National Intelligence Agency
The Republic Thai Air Force Command Center
The Republic Thai Navy Command Center
The Republic Thai Police
The Republic Armed Forces Headquarters
The Republic Thai Air Defense Command
The Naval Special Warfare Command
The Air Force Security Force Command
 
Last edited:

Bossza007

I am From Thailand
GA Member
World Power
May 4, 2021
2,159
Secret unless contextual possible.

Thailand-map-CIA-en.jpg

The Map of Thailand

At the time of Operation Aerial Shield Commencement, all personnel and assets involved in this task were already on standby at their respective bases, a status they had maintained even before the planning of the operation began. This state of readiness was not a result of foresight regarding the specific operation, but rather a testament to the established protocols of the Republic of Thai Air Force. These protocols mandated that at least 4 F-16 AM, 2 F-16 BM, and 6 Saab JA 37D aircraft be perpetually equipped with the necessary Intercept mission loadout. These aircraft, stationed at a strategic airbase within proximity to potential hotspots, were maintained in a state of high alert, ready for immediate deployment as part of a Combat Air Patrol (CAP). The crews assigned to these aircraft, both pilots and support personnel, underwent regular drills and simulations to ensure their swift response capability, thereby enabling them to mobilize within minutes of receiving an operational directive.

The operational bases of each fighter squadron were perpetually active, fully functional, and on high alert, embodying the epitome of readiness and efficiency. They had established a sophisticated data link system, a vital component for both the aircraft in flight and the ground command and control units. This system was seamlessly integrated with the Republic Thai Armed Forces Headquarters (RTAFHQ) Situational Awareness Display (SAD) and Tactical Picture Display (TPD) of the Command and Control (C2) System. This integration facilitated real-time data transmission and reception, ensuring that every squadron was not only alert to the current tactical situation but also fully prepared for rapid response. The system's advanced encryption ensured secure communication, maintaining operational integrity and preventing any potential breach of sensitive information.

The personnel on active duty in the Thai Air Force, particularly those assigned to Operation Aerial Shield, were not just elite but the epitome of aerial warfare prowess. These pilots, ground crews, and support staff were the culmination of a rigorous and intensive 16-week training program, a prerequisite to joining the Air Force. Beyond this initiation, they engaged in continuous learning and development programs, encompassing advanced tactical training, cutting-edge technology utilization, and comprehensive combat simulations, ensuring they remained at the forefront of aerial warfare techniques and strategies.

Each member was a paragon of physical health and mental soundness, a direct result of thorough well-being programs designed for high-stress environments. Their dietary regimens were meticulously planned, featuring nutritious meals tailored to individual health requirements and performance goals. Additionally, most personnel had a distinguished service record that included active deployment during the period of the Fourth Indochina War. This experience, combined with their exposure to a variety of deployment scenarios, honed their skills, resilience, and adaptability to an unparalleled degree.

All the aircraft of the Thai Air Force, especially those assigned to Operation Aerial Shield, had undergone meticulous maintenance and rigorous assessment routines. Their participation in continuous modernization and upkeep programs was a testament to the Air Force's commitment to excellence. This consistent attention to detail ensured that each aircraft operated at peak efficiency, mirroring the exemplary characteristics expected of them in their prime.

The maintenance teams, equipped with advanced diagnostic tools and technology, conducted thorough inspections and upgrades. From the smallest sensor to the most complex flight systems, every component was scrutinized and optimized. The structural integrity of each aircraft was routinely tested under simulated extreme conditions, guaranteeing their resilience and reliability. Similarly, the operational systems, encompassing navigation, communication, and combat capabilities, were kept at the forefront of technological advancement, ensuring efficiency and efficacy in all flight operations. This holistic approach to maintenance and modernization meant that the Thai Air Force's fleet was not only ready but also at the leading edge of aerial combat and defense capabilities.

Below is the specification of the intercept mission loadout of the Thai F16AM/BM Block 20 MLU:

Guns:
1 × 20 mm (0.787 in) M61A1 Vulcan 6-barrel rotary cannon, 515 rounds
Hardpoints: 2 × wing-tip air-to-air missile launch rails, 6 × under-wing, and 3 × under-fuselage pylon (2 of 3 for sensors) stations with a capacity of up to 17,000 lb (7,700 kg) of storage.
Armaments:
  • 6 × AIM-120C AMRAAM
  • SUU-42A/A Flares/Infrared decoys dispenser pod and chaff pod
  • AN/ALQ-131 & AN/ALQ-184 ECM pods on the centerline
  • 600 US gallon Sargent Fletcher drop tanks
Below is the specification of the intercept mission loadout of the Thai Saab JA 37D:

Gun:
1 × 30 mm Oerlikon KCA cannon with 125 rounds
Hardpoints: 6 missile stations
Armaments:
  • 2*RB71 Skyflash
  • 4*RB99 AMRAAM
 

Bossza007

I am From Thailand
GA Member
World Power
May 4, 2021
2,159
Secret unless contextual possible.

Operation Aerial Shield had been exceedingly active, functioning at the pinnacle of preparedness. Every member of the personnel had maintained optimal health, mental acuity, and readiness, reflecting a standard of excellence in their training and resilience. Similarly, each aircraft within the operation had been kept in a state of integral efficiency, meticulously maintained, and ready for immediate deployment.

The Republic Thai Air Force, tasked with the stewardship of the National Air Defense System of Thailand (NADST), had been operating four AN/TPS-77 radars, with plans to incorporate three additional units imminently. While the current setup had proven sustainable and effective, there was an ambitious roadmap to expand the network to ten radars, aiming for more comprehensive surveillance coverage across Thailand's airspace. The operational efficiency of NADST was not just a goal but a reality, with its system perpetually active, and its personnel always on peak alert, ensuring robust defense readiness and unparalleled airspace monitoring capabilities at all times.

Operational Aerial Shield, encompassing elements of the Air Force, functioned within the stringent framework of the Airspace Security Measures of the Republic Thai Air Force. This initiative, pivotal in ensuring the inviolability of Thailand's sovereign airspace, was systematically executed across three designated zones: Evening Zone, Twilight Zone, and Midnight Zone. Each zone, distinctly demarcated and extending specific nautical miles from the Thai border, was governed by tailored measures adapted to its unique operational needs and strategic significance. The specific protocols applicable to each zone, meticulously detailed and regularly updated to reflect evolving security dynamics, could be found in the comprehensive document attached herewith. This strategic division into zones allowed for a more nuanced and effective control of airspace, ensuring robust defense and surveillance capabilities throughout.​
 

Bossza007

I am From Thailand
GA Member
World Power
May 4, 2021
2,159
Secret unless contextual possible.

The Thai 701st and 702nd Air Control Squadrons, in a strategic move, were assigned to partake in Operation Aerial Shield, tasked specifically with exercising their airborne early warning and control capabilities. Each squadron, operating a pair of Saab 340 AEW&C aircraft—known within the Thai service as R-100s—was at peak readiness. These sophisticated aircraft, equipped with advanced radar and surveillance systems, played a pivotal role in the operation.

All personnel, meticulously selected for their expertise and experience, were ordered to report to their respective air bases, locations critical for the operation's success. The 701st Squadron converged at Surat Thani Air Base, a site chosen for its strategic positioning and advanced infrastructure, while the 702nd assembled at Hat Yai Air Base, known for its robust command and control facilities. Both bases were in a state of heightened alert, with security protocols rigorously enforced to ensure the safety and secrecy of the operation.

The crews underwent final briefings and systems checks, ensuring that every individual and piece of equipment was in optimal condition. This meticulous preparation underscored the importance of their mission and the precision required for its successful execution.

At the time of the launch and throughout the entirety of the operation, every member of the team was in peak physical and mental condition. This was a direct result of a meticulously structured welfare program that focused on holistic health, encompassing balanced nutrition and mental resilience exercises. The nourishing regimens provided were tailored to optimize physical stamina and cognitive sharpness, essential for the demands of their roles.

Each individual had initially undergone a comprehensive 16-week training program upon joining the Air Force, covering a wide array of military scenarios ranging from tactical combat exercises to strategic planning and survival skills. This foundational training was critical in preparing them for the diverse challenges of military operations.

Following this, a further specialized 16-week training program was mandatory for those selected to become R-100 operators. This phase was more intensive and focused, delving into the specific skills and knowledge required for operating and maintaining the R-100 systems. It included advanced simulations, technical equipment handling, and emergency response drills, ensuring that each operator was not only proficient in their role but also adaptable to any unforeseen circumstances that might arise during operations.

Before the operation commenced, each of the R-100s was freshly produced domestically by the Republic Ordnance Manufacturing Center (ROMC). To guarantee their operational efficiency and structural integrity, these aircraft underwent a series of intensive and rigorous resilience and stress tests. These evaluations were meticulously conducted by the ROMC in collaboration with specialized units of the Thai Air Force.

The testing process included advanced simulations of extreme weather conditions and combat scenarios to assess the aircraft's durability and response capabilities. Additionally, each R-100 was subjected to thorough technical inspections to evaluate its electronic warfare systems, surveillance radars, and communication systems. The engines and flight control systems were also tested beyond standard operational limits to ensure peak performance under the most demanding circumstances.

Upon completing these exhaustive tests, the aircraft were certified by both the ROMC and the Thai Air Force as fully operational and ready for deployment. This meticulous preparation process ensured that when the R-100s were deployed, they were not only in prime condition but also equipped with the latest technology and prepared for any operational challenges they might encounter in the field.

The 701st Air Control Squadron, based at Surat Thani Air Base, had departed for a mission over the Andaman Sea, specifically targeting the NK and NJ areas. Utilizing the R-100, their flight trajectory was meticulously planned to cover strategic points within these sectors. Similarly, the 702nd Air Control Squadron from Hat Yai Airbase embarked on a parallel mission in the Gulf of Thailand, specifically the OJ region. This operation was conducted outside the usual perimeter of the National Air Defense System of Thailand (NADST), indicating a special reconnaissance and surveillance mandate.

Both squadrons maintained a cruising speed of 200 kilometers per hour, flying at an altitude of 20,000 feet. This optimal altitude facilitated extensive radar coverage while ensuring safety and efficiency. Throughout the deployment, every crew member, from pilots to surveillance operators, adhered to strict operational protocols, maintaining high alert status. The onboard systems of the R-100, including advanced radar and communication equipment, were fully active and continuously monitored to ensure peak performance.

To support this heightened state of readiness, the crew followed rigorous health and wellness regimes. This encompassed not only physical fitness routines but also mental health strategies to ensure alertness and operational effectiveness. The strategic positioning and readiness of these squadrons underscored their pivotal role in surveillance and air control within these critical maritime areas.​
 

Bossza007

I am From Thailand
GA Member
World Power
May 4, 2021
2,159
Secret unless contextual possible.

The R-100s, key components of the Republic Thai Air Force's aerial surveillance, were deployed in a meticulously planned sequence within their designated zone, ensuring continuous coverage. Each Saab 340 AEW&C aircraft, taking off from a strategically located airbase, was airborne for a precise duration of six hours. This schedule was synchronized to the minute; as one R-100 commenced its descent towards the base, its successor was already airborne, smoothly transitioning into its surveillance role a dozen kilometers into the designated zone.

This efficient relay ensured that at the moment the first aircraft's wheels touched the runway, the second was already fully operational in its surveillance capacity. While on the ground, each R-100 underwent a thorough but swift refueling and maintenance process, a testament to the ground crew's expertise and efficiency. The maintenance teams, working in perfect harmony with the flight crews, ensured that every system was in optimal condition before the next sortie.

The care extended to the crews mirrored the attention given to their aircraft. Every individual, from pilots to surveillance operators, received top-tier support for their physical and mental well-being. This included comprehensive health checks, restful downtime, and access to quality nutrition, ensuring they were in prime condition for their demanding roles.​
 

Bossza007

I am From Thailand
GA Member
World Power
May 4, 2021
2,159
Secret unless contextual possible.

NADST.jpg

National Air Defense System of Thailand (NADST)

The Thai R-100s, identified as Saab 340 AEW&C in the service of the Republic Thai Air Force, had completed numerous sorties since the launch of Operation Aerial Shield. As indicated by the green circle in the photo above and corroborated by the layout of the National Air Defense System of Thailand (NADST), each aircraft diligently adhered to its assigned flying course, a crucial element in representing Thailand's designated early warning system.

These R-100s consistently flew at a speed of 180 knots (333.36 km/hr.) and maintained an altitude of 20,000 feet (6,096 meters). Particularly notable was their operational protocol upon reaching the center point within the area marked by the green circle on the NADST map. Here, they executed a precise Racetrack Pattern flight, with each leg of this pattern extending up to 30 kilometers. This maneuver not only demonstrated their operational efficiency but also ensured comprehensive surveillance coverage, thereby fortifying the aerial defense mechanism of the operation.

The crew onboard the R-100s, comprising the Pilot-in-Command (Captain), Co-Pilot (First Officer), Radar Operator, Sensor Operator, Mission Commander/Tactical Coordinator, and Communications and Systems Operator, were acutely conscious of their aircraft's operational and structural integrities at all times. This encompassed a vigilant monitoring of critical parameters such as the remaining fuel levels, which were regularly cross-checked with the planned mission duration to ensure ample reserves. The cruising speed was meticulously maintained within optimal ranges to balance fuel efficiency and mission timelines.

Additionally, they were constantly updated with precise weather reports, ensuring they could navigate around any potential atmospheric disturbances. Their navigation charts were not only up to date but also double-checked against real-time data for accuracy. As a result, they had already taken comprehensive measures to guarantee the aircraft's functionality throughout the mission, anticipating and preemptively addressing any potential issues that might arise.

In the event of a fuel emergency, either due to low fuel or a leak, the crew adhered to a rigorously defined emergency protocol. This protocol began with a thorough identification of the issue, determining whether it was indeed a fuel leak or unexpectedly low fuel levels. To assess the situation's severity, they meticulously checked the fuel gauges and related systems. This often involved cross-referencing various instruments to ensure the accuracy of the readings.

Upon recognizing a potential fuel emergency, the pilots promptly informed Air Traffic Control (ATC) of the situation. They declared an emergency, a critical step that granted the aircraft priority handling by ATC, thereby facilitating a quicker and safer route to the nearest suitable airport. The crew diligently referred to the aircraft's emergency procedures or checklist, which outlined specific actions to be taken in the event of a fuel crisis.

In cases where a fuel leak was suspected or confirmed, the crew's response was immediate and precise. They would isolate the affected fuel tank by shutting off the relevant valves or fuel pumps, adhering strictly to the steps outlined in the emergency checklist. Utilizing the onboard navigation systems and coordinating with ATC, they identified the most viable landing option—either the nearest airport or, if feasible, a Thai airbase. The selection of a landing site was meticulously based on several factors, including the runway length, airport facilities, current weather conditions, and the aircraft's remaining fuel capacity.

Consistently, all aircraft followed a fuel management protocol where they would return to their air base when the fuel level reached a threshold set at the distance back to the air base plus an additional 75 kilometers. This policy ensured a margin of safety, allowing for unexpected developments during flight.

In the event of any detection, whether it was an unidentified object at sea or an aircraft in the sky, all relevant data captured by the onboard systems or sensors aboard the vessel were recorded instantly. This comprehensive data collection included, but was not limited to, precise navigational coordinates, detailed weather readings capturing atmospheric conditions, and distinct radar signatures identifying the size, speed, and trajectory of the detected object.

Importantly, the R-100, a key component of the vessel's intelligence apparatus, was directly data-linked to the Republic Thai Armed Forces Headquarters (RTAFHQ). This advanced connectivity ensured that any detection made by RTAFHQ’s broader radar network or systems was also instantaneously displayed on the vessel's Situational Awareness Display (SAD) and Tactical Picture Display (TPD) or vice versa. These displays offered a real-time, integrated view of the operational environment, combining data from both the vessel's local sensors and the national defense network.

Every piece of information, no matter how minute, was reported in real-time. This allowed for immediate analysis and decision-making, ensuring that the crew was always equipped with the most current situational understanding to respond to any potential threats or anomalies.​
 

Bossza007

I am From Thailand
GA Member
World Power
May 4, 2021
2,159
Secret unless contextual possible.


images-24.jpg

The Thai Air Force 407th Fighter Squadron, "Python," flying​

During Operation Aerial Shield, RTAF Wing Three, known for its high operational readiness and interoperability, reached peak efficiency. This was particularly vital as they were tasked with coordinating cross-operations with Operation Coastal Shield and Operation Guardian Harmony. At that critical juncture, RTAF Wing Three's Combat Air Patrol (CAP) consisted of a well-maintained and ready fleet: 6 Saab 37 D fighter aircraft, renowned for their agility and precision, and 8 F-16 AM plus 4 F-16 BM Block 20 MLU, recognized for their advanced multi-role capabilities. This formidable air fleet was further supported by the 701st and 702nd Air Control Squadrons. These squadrons operated 4 Saab 340 AEW&C aircraft, equipped with state-of-the-art airborne early warning and control systems. These aircraft were integral in providing comprehensive surveillance and command and control capabilities, enhancing the strategic efficiency of both air and ground operations. Each unit within the RTAF Wing Three had undergone rigorous training exercises leading up to the operation, ensuring seamless coordination and effective response capabilities. Their preparedness was a testament to the meticulous planning and dedication that had gone into Operation Aerial Shield.

Regular exercises were integral to their well-established health regimens. The Command and Control (C2) personnel routinely briefed the pilots and ground crews on intelligence pertaining to the exercise area. These briefings focused on weather patterns, potential hazards, including any unusual maritime or aerial activities, and prevailing air traffic patterns. Each peacetime exercise, typically conducted during periods of low threat, spanned up to 10 days.

In the initial three days, they extensively conducted familiarization flights, covering the entire operational area. This phase included standard combat air patrols and AEW&C (Airborne Early Warning and Control) surveillance missions, with an emphasis on geospatial familiarity and routine operational procedures. During days 4 to 6, they meticulously performed air-to-air combat and interception drills, along with air-to-surface exercises, simulating maritime strike missions. These drills were designed to enhance tactical proficiency and response capabilities in various combat scenarios.

On the seventh day, the focus shifted to coordination with assets and deployed forces of Operation Coastal Shield and Operation Guardian Harmony. Activities included joint patrol and interception drills, coupled with engaging in mock combat exercises, specifically designed to test and enhance inter-operability among various units.

Days 8 and 9 were dedicated to simulating high-intensity conflict scenarios, testing advanced tactical maneuvers and AEW&C coordinated operations. These exercises were crucial in assessing the unit's readiness for potential real-world high-threat environments.

On the last day, the tenth, they conducted comprehensive debriefing sessions. These sessions involved a thorough evaluation of each unit's performance, identifying areas for improvement, and gathering valuable lessons learned. The post-exercise analysis was rigorous, involving the collection of all exercise data for detailed analysis. Feedback was actively solicited from all participants to prepare a comprehensive report, which included recommendations for enhancing the efficacy of future exercises.​
 

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